Comic Book Movies and Kids

*Blogger puts soapbox down on the floor and stands on it*

The wild success of the Spiderman movies has led to a rise in the number of comic book properties being adapted for the silver screen. This means adults can enjoy watching the comics they grew up reading come to life and youngsters can get hooked on these amazing characters and their abilities and start reading all about them in comic books. It’s a win-win.

spiderman-new

However, there seems to be a misconception that all movies based on comic books are appropriate for youngsters. This could not be further from the truth. Examples of comic book movies that are not appropriate for kids include 300 for the sheer amount of blood and/or gore, V for Vendetta for the heavy political content, and The Watchmen for heavy moral/ethical content. The most recent comic book movie that is absolutely not for kids is Deadpool. It doesn’t even pretend to be even remotely for kids.

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Tons of gore and scantily clad men: Not for kids

Don’t believe me? Pick up some Deadpool comics and read them. I’ll wait. He’s pretty inappropriate isn’t he? Told you! I’m not knocking Deadpool. In fact I think his lack of a filter is part of his charm. I think that most movie ratings put on by the MPAA are nothing short of censorship, but I’m willing to say that Deadpool earned its R rating fair and square. So what’s the big deal? Nothing if you’re not a child under the age of 17. If you want to head out and see Deadpool, go for it! However, if you are the parent of a kid under the age of 17, I suggest you make the decision on whether you want your child to see this movie with extreme caution.

My kid can handle it.

No, I’m afraid not. I know you think that your precious snowflake is the exception and not the rule, but I assure you he/she is still a kid. That means that even though he/she may be smart enough not to copy Deadpool’s behavior, there’s a chance that he/she might decide to try to repeat some potty language to sound cool in front of his/her friends at school. What happens when kids get caught swearing at school? They end up in trouble and then you have to explain to the teacher where your little snowflake learned such naughty words. Whose fault is it going to be that your child picked up bad language? Is it going to be the fault of the parent who didn’t do his/her homework on the movie they were about to allow the kid to see? NO! It’s going to be the movie’s fault! How dare they put out such filth! Why I’m going to contact that studio and complain!

V_for_Vendetta_by_Rub_a_Duckie
Heavy political content: Not for kids

So what if one person complains?

Well that’s just it. Complaints are like cockroaches. There’s never only one and if too many uninformed parents complain, the studio will put a lid on Deadpool forever and basically ruin it for the fans that are actually old enough and mature enough to handle it.

So what should I do? My kid really likes Deadpool.

Unless your child has actually read the comics, he/she doesn’t really know who Deadpool is.

But isn’t Deadpool that guy in the X-Men Origins: Wolverine movie?

NO! THAT’S NOT THE REAL DEADPOOL! YOU SHUT YOUR HOLE! I’ll say it again, read the freakin’ comics. If you don’t have time look online. I’m sure at the very least a Google image search should reveal how inappropriate for kids Deadpool really is. If you don’t have time to do that, watch the trailer but not the squeaky clean trailer they showed on TV. Go on YouTube and search for the unrated trailer. If you still think your child can hang, that’s fine. At least you made an informed decision.

Watchmen
Heavy moral/ethical content: Not for kids

But what if I read some comics and watch the unrated trailer and I really don’t think that Deadpool is age-appropriate for my child? What should I do?

Simple! When he/she asks to see Deadpool, you say no. Easy peasy, lemon squeezy.

But if I say no my child will be upset!

Good! If your child doesn’t get pissed off at you once in a while, you’re not doing your job. Kids need rules, boundaries, and limitations. You’re not your child’s friend. You’re the parent. Stop catering to them. My parents said no to me loads of times. I didn’t die. In fact I’m probably still alive because my parents said no. Trust me, they’ll get over it. Do you watch Game of Thrones? Remember that Joffrey bastard? You’re happy he’s gone right? We all are! Do you know what happens when you don’t say no to your kids every now and then? JOFFREY! Joffrey is what happens when you don’t say no to your kids.

I did my research, made an informed decision, I let my kid see the movie and he/she tried to use the language and got in trouble at school. Whose fault is it?

The fault lies with both of you. It’s your child’s fault because he/she knew good and well what would happen if he/she got caught talking like that in school and did it anyway. So, hold him/her accountable and deal out some punishment. Again, rules, boundaries, limitations like Cesar Milan suggests for dogs. Oddly enough it works on kids, too. Go figure. It’s also your fault because even though you made an informed decision, ultimately you still allowed your child to see the movie. Seriously if I hear you at the theater demanding a refund, or read a post on social media complaining about this movie and blaming a fictional character for your kid’s behavior I’m going to have no problem pointing out your stupidity. Take responsibility for your actions. Thanks for reading and happy watching! Or not watching, whichever you choose.

*Blogger steps down off of soapbox, picks it up, and walks away whistling “Shoop” by Salt-n-Pepa*

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